Some thoughts on tubeless bike tire tech, and random food for thought.

Tubeless. I know, most people don’t think there’s a debate, but there is. I converted the SX-C2 wheels on my Giant to tubeless using only Stans yellow rim tape. It works fine with the RaRa’s that came on the bike, but the Tioga Psycho Genius and the Conti Mountain King I was running on it won’t seat on those wheels, not even with an air compressor. Having decided after an exhausting and treacherous ride this morning that the WTB Nano I’d been running on the back of the SS was finally toast, I endeavored to mount said Tioga on the Pacenti wheel on the back of the single speed. It was completely drama free. So what’s this with a debate?

I’ve heard people who ride quite a bit, and have a lot to do with bikes say that tubeless is not worth the trouble, it doesn’t work, etc. – and not to try it. I can’t help but think this is complete hog wash. No, those tires didn’t mount to the SX-C2 wheels, but then, Giant doesn’t rate those as tubeless compatible wheels, either. It’s also fairly well known that there are some tire and rim combinations that simply don’t work, even though both may be “Tubeless Compatible” in their own way. The bottom line is, do a little home work, and be prepared to improvise, should the need arise. I don’t run stupid low pressures in my tires, I weigh about 220 with a loaded Camel Back on, and run 30psi in the rear, and 25 in the front. I’ve not had an issue with burping, I haven’t had a flat since I started running tubeless, and the difference that the 2-4 psi less in the tires makes both in ride quality AND traction is noticeable, welcome, and huge.

So, if you’re on the fence, give it a whirl. Tech has come a long way in the past couple of years towards making tubeless better and easier.

Also, your random musical thought for the day: Joe Strummer would have been 61 years old today.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Some thoughts on tubeless bike tire tech, and random food for thought.

  1. Hmm, maybe I really should give tubeless a try. Although the last ride I was on a girls tubeless burst gunk everywhere and she had to put tubes in eventually. Maybe I will have more success!

    • The two most common problems with tubeless, once it’s set up, is using too much pressure to seat the bead, or running too low a pressure on the trail. If you want to take a little of the edge off of the trail (a big deal for me since one of my bikes is a rigid single speed) or just want more traction, you owe it to yourself to give it a shot.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s